Glossary of Shuffleboard Terms

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10
The triangular area inside the painted lines at the top of the scoring diagram. Scoring discs wholly within the 10 count as ten points.

10-87
A frame game format where for the first round only scoring discs in the 10 count, the second round only scoring discs in the 8 count and the third round only scoring discs in the 7 count. This rotation repeats for subsequent rounds. Scoring discs in the 10-off always count as plus 10 points for the opposite color (e.g., a yellow disc in the 10-off counts as plus-10 for black, not minus-10 for yellow).

10-MINUS-10
UP AND DOWN SHOT.

10-Off
The section of the scoring diagram, at the opposite end from the shooting players, that is closest to the standing area, including the areas inside the painted lines along with the separation triangle in its center. Scoring discs wholly within the 10-off usually count as minus ten points. Also KITCHEN, SOUP.

10-Pin
A point game format where one bowling pin is placed upright at each end on the scoring triangle, centered at the upper end of the centerline and just touching the 10/8 line. Any time a shot causes one of the bowling pins to fall over, immediately the shooting player receives a deduction of ten points from their score, the shot cue disc is considered a dead disc and removed from the board, and the fallen bowling pin is placed upright in its original position. Once a player reaches 65 points or higher at the end of a frame, their score is pegged at 65 (although it can go lower in a later frame if they are kitchened or they knock down a bowling pin). To win, a player must have a scoring 10 and hasn't gone below 65 points at the end of any frame where they started the frame with 65 points. If both players have 65 points at the start of a frame and both score a 10, the game continues as long as neither has gone below 65 total points in the frame.

10/8 Line
The line of the scoring triangle separating the 10 scoring area from the 8 scoring areas. Also 8/10 LINE.

7
Either of the two areas inside the painted lines of the scoring diagram that are between an 8 and the 10-off. Scoring discs wholly within the 7 count as seven points.

7/10-Off Line
The line of the scoring triangle separating the 7 scoring areas from the 10-Off scoring area. Also 7/KITCHEN-LINE.

7/8 Line
8/7 LINE.

7/Kitchen Line
7/10-OFF LINE.

8
Either of the two areas inside the painted lines of the scoring diagram that are between the 10 and a 7. Scoring discs wholly within the 8 count as eight points.

8/10 Line
10/8 LINE.

8/7 Line
The line of the scoring triangle separating the 8 scoring areas from the 7 scoring areas. Also 7/8 LINE.

Alley
The channel to either side of the board that runs parallel along the board the whole length of the court. Alleys are usually 2-feet wide. Also GUTTER.

Apex
The pointed tip of the scoring diagram.

Apron
SHOOTING AREA (def. 1).

Backstop
A disc on the scoring diagram which can be utilized as an aide to stop a moving disc in a position in front of it when struck. Usually refers to a liner which when struck head on will leave the moving disc stopped in a scoring position.

Bait
KITCHEN BAIT.

Baseline
1. The horizontal line which separates the scoring diagram from the shooting area. 2. The imaginary horizontal line that includes the baseline (def. 1) and extends through the alleys on the two sides of the court. Also FOUL LINE.

Beads
Fine glass globules, often coated in silicone, that are sprinkled on a court to reduce the friction between the bottom of the discs and the court surface.

Behind
A position that is further away from the shooting players than a particular disc or location on the court.

Biscuit
DISC.

Black
1. The darker of the two colors of a set of discs. 2. The player who shoots this color discs. 3. The side of the court where this color discs are placed in the starting area.

Black Court
A court that has the strongest drift from the black side towards the yellow side, thereby favoring the player shooting the black discs.

Block
1. Make a shot which causes a disc to stop in a position which obstructs one's opponent from targeting a particular live disc or position on the board. 2. A disc stopped in such a position. 3. GUARD. 4. COVER A DISC. 5. DISC.

Block the Board
Put up one or more blocks to limit the shots available to one's opponent for making a scoring disc.

Blocking Game
A game strategy which emphasizes the use of blocks to minimize the opponent's opportunities to make scoring discs, as contrasted with a clearing game.

Board
1. All of the court other than the shooting areas. (Example: "The disc is removed from the board as it did not reach the deadline.") 2. The half of the court at the end opposite from the shooting players which includes all areas of the court where a stopped disc can be a live disc. (Example: "He cleared all the discs from the board.") 3. SCORING DIAGRAM. (Example: "Put up a guard before going on the board.")

Bracket
1. Step ranges in game score, such as the "ten bracket" is a score from 10 to 19, the "twenty bracket" is a score from 20 to 29, etc. 2. In tournament play, the diagram which shows the match assignments, wins, losses and advancements in ranking of the players. A tournament may have more than one bracket, most commonly a Main Bracket that tracks the winners of the first match of the tournament and a Consolation Bracket that separately tracks the losers of the first match of the tournament, each bracket maintaining its own ranking of the players through the end of the tournament.

Buck Fever
The tendency to shoot the hammer short of its target due to the mental pressure of scoring one's hammer shot.

Bump Up
Strike a target disc to push it forward onto the board to make it a scoring disc, usually hidden by the cue disc which struck it. Also BUNT.

Bunny
A scoring disc that will give a player the winning score if not knocked out of scoring.

Bunt
BUMP UP.

Call a Disc
Make a determination whether or not a live disc is a scoring disc.

Carom
A shot where the cue disc hits a target disc and then moves in another direction to strike one or more other target discs.

Centerline
The vertical line down the center of the scoring diagram.

Charting
Notating and using a drift card.

Chase a Disc
Attempt to clear a hidden scoring disc. Often denotes a strategic choice to go after the scoring disc rather than some other, possibly more beneficial, strategy.

Chip
The cue disc narrowly touching a side of a live disc unintentionally, thus diverting the cue disc partially or fully from its intended destination. Also CHIP.

Clean
A description of the board where there are few or no discs on the scoring diagram during the play of an end. An educated player who has the hammer will most often as an ideal game strategy keep the board clean by clearing on the first three discs shot and then scoring the hammer.

Clean the Board
CLEAR THE BOARD.

Clear
Shoot the cue disc such that one or more target discs are moved off of the board.

Clear the Board
Shoot the cue disc in a manner which leaves no or few live discs on the board. This is done to take away or keep off discs from the board that one's opponent might use to their advantage. Also CLEAN THE BOARD.

Clearing Game
A game strategy which emphasizes clearing the board and scoring one's hammers to maximize one's point lead, as contrasted with a blocking game.

Clearwater
A disc in a Tampa position except positioned on the opposite side of the 10 from the shooting player.

Click
CHIP. Used as an exclamation, usually while the cue disc is in motion, to note or emphasize the unintentional mistake.

Close Disc
A disc that has stopped inside the scoring diagram but close enough to one or more lines that it is difficult to determine if it is a scoring disc without close examination.

Coaching
A sign or verbal hint intended to help another player in their game. Coaching one's partner in a tournament during a game is usually subject to penalty.

Combination
1. A shot where the cue disc strikes one or more target discs which in turn strike one or more other target discs that may also in turn strike additional target discs. It may be used to score one's own covered disc(s) or to clear the opponent's covered disc(s), or both. 2. CAROM 3. A shot which combines 1. and 2.

Cooking
An expression to emphasize to your opponent that his disc has landed in the kitchen.

Counter Block
FILL IN.

Court
The complete area for play of a game including the board, alleys, benches and shooting areas.

Cover
1. Make a shot which causes a disc to stop in a position where it acts as a block for one or more live discs. 2.BLOCK (def. 2).

Cripple
PIGEON.

Cross Guard
ST. PETE.

Cross Pilot
ST. PETE.

Cue
A straight uniform or tapered rod with a two-pronged head, used to impel a disc down the court. A cue may be up to 6'3" in length per FSA regulations. Also CUE STICK, STICK, TANG.

Cue Disc
The disc a player is currently shooting.

Cue Stick
CUE.

Dead Disc
1. A disc which is out of play after being shot because it has left the board, touched any part of an alley or failed to reach the deadline. A disc may also be declared dead as part of certain tournament rules violations or penalties. A dead disc is immediately removed from the board before play continues. 2. A disc which is in a position that makes it mostly useless as a target disc for a carom or combination shot. 3. A disc which normally is not considered useful as a target disc to be kitchened due to its distance or angle away from the kitchen.

Deadline
One of the two horizontal lines on the court that are three feet in front of the scoring diagram at each end of the court. Any disc which does not touch or cross the deadline at the opposite end after being shot is a dead disc. Also LAGLINE.

Deep
Describes the position of a scoring disc that is close to but not touching the line directly behind it or the position of a guard that is behind its usual or ideal position. (Examples: "A deep 7 may get bumped into the kitchen"; "A deep St. Pete blocks a smaller area of the board.") Also LOW.

Diagram
SCORING DIAGRAM.

Disc
The puck used in shuffleboard for shooting and scoring. A set consists of eight discs, four each of two different colors, usually black and yellow, black and white, or black and red. Also BISCUIT, BLOCK.

Double
Strike a target disc in a manner that makes both the target disc and another disc of the same color (usually the cue disc) into scoring discs. Most times the target disc is a liner before the shot is made.

Doubles
1. A game where a team of two players competes against a team of two other players. 2. A tournment format wherein two players enter the tournament as a team and compete against other teams of two players.

Doubling Disc
A disc on the board which is in a favorable position to be doubled.

Draw Doubles
1. A game where the partners of each team are selected by a random draw. 2. A tournament format wherein the partners of each team of two players are selected by a random draw before the start of the tournament.

Drift
1. The tendency of a cue disc to swerve off of a straight line as it travels down the court due to variations from a flat horizontal plane, which are usually imperceptible to the eye, in the playing surface of the court. 2. The state of a court that has playing surface variations causing such tendencies. (Example: "The court we played on had a lot of drift.")

Drift Card
A handheld paper representation of a board, its scoring diagram and locations for discs upon which a player makes notations, used during a game as a memory aide for adjusting the aim of shots to acccount for drifts and other anomolies of the court. Often used by professional players during tournament play.

Drive By
A shot where the cue disc errs to the side of a target disc without touching it and continues well beyond, usually through the kitchen and off the board.

End
1. The head or the foot of a court. 2. The shooting of all discs from one end during a game.

Fast
1. Describes a court where the discs require less impelling force than usual to slide from one end to the other due to the condition of the court. 2. Describes a disc which takes less force than usual to slide down the court due to the condition of the disc.

Fill In
Shoot the cue disc to a position which obstructs one's opponent from hiding a disc behind an existing guard. Most often refers to the placement of a Tampa to block the use of an opponent's St. Pete. Also COUNTER BLOCK.

Foot
The end of the court that is opposite the scoreboard.

Fort Knox
Describes a disc that is so well guarded it is nearly impossible to clear.

Foul Line
BASELINE. So named because fouling the line (stepping on or over it) while shooting is subject to a penalty in tournament play.

Frame
1. The portion of a game wherein players shoot all the discs from one end and post a score on the scoreboard, whether in non-walking singles, walking singles or doubles, as per FSA rules. Also HALF-ROUND. 2. In some locales, the portion of a doubles game wherein the players at both ends in turn shoot all the discs. Also ROUND (in doubles).

Frame Game
A game where the winner is determined by the highest total recorded score at the end of a pre-determined number of frames.

Free Ride
A guard that is protruding into No Man's Land that can be targeted with a forceful bump up in an attempt to push it forward into the kitchen with little risk of the cue disc becoming a replacement for the guard. If the cue disc sticks, it will stop short of the deadline and therefore will be removed from the board as a dead disc.

Friendly Game
FUN GAME.

FSA
Florida Shuffleboard Association: http://www.fsa-shuffleboard.org/

Fun Game
A game outside of tournament competition, played for fun or training. Also FRIENDLY GAME.

Glance
A shot where the cue disc strikes an edge of a target disc such that the cue disc alters course to stop in an intended favorable position on the board. Most often used to make the cue disc a hidden scoring disc.

Go On The Board
Shoot the cue disc onto the scoring diagram, usually as a scoring disc that is not hidden.

Good
Describes a disc which is a scoring disc.

Guard
A disc in a position on the board such that it would interfere with an opponent's attempt to target any disc that is behind it. The St. Pete and the Tampa are generally considered the best guard positions for hiding scoring discs. Also BLOCK (defs. 1 & 2), HIDE, LID.

Gutter
ALLEY.

Half Round
FRAME (def. 1).

Hammer
The last disc to be shot in an end.

Hard Shot
A shot where the cue disc or a disc cleared by it has enough moving force that it could cause injury to a player or spectator. Use of this shot in a tournament is usually subject to penalty.

Head
The end of the court that has the scoreboard.

Headhunter
A player who often shoots to kitchen an opponent's Tampa or St. Pete guards in preference to using their own guard to hide their cue disc. Similar to KITCHEN PLAYER.

Hesitation Shot
A shot where the cue stick noticeably slows or stops and then continues forward while impelling the cue disc. Use of this shot in a tournament is usually subject to penalty.

Hidden
Describes a scoring disc that is protected by a guard.

Hide
1. Shoot or move a disc to a position where it is a scoring disc protected by a block. 2. A scoring disc protected by a guard. 3. GUARD .

High
Describes the position of a scoring disc that sits less than the width of a disc (six inches) to the line or lines directly in front of it, leaving less space than needed for placement of a scoring disc in front of it. (Example: "Shoot a high 8 to stop the hammer.") 2. Describes a guard that is in front of its usual or ideal position. (Example: "I prefer a high St. Pete.")

Hook Shot
A shot where the cue stick noticeably changes direction while impelling the cue disc. Use of this shot in a tournament is usually subject to penalty.

Horse Collar
A frame game format where partners stand and shoot at one end, attempting to score as many discs as possible for the frame, opponents then shooting from the opposite end to complete the frame. Also HOSS COLLAR. Originated as a table shuffleboard game in the late 1940s, named after the curved wooden end railings of the table that are a similar shape to a horse's collar.

Hoss Collar
HORSE COLLAR. 'Hoss' is a Southern dialectical pronunciation of 'horse'.

House
SCORING DIAGRAM.

If You Can't See 'Em, Join 'Em
An expression which reinforces a strategy of shooting a scoring disc behind a guard as a response to your opponent doing the same, rather than chasing your opponent's hidden scoring disc.

In Front
A position that is closer to the shooting players than a particular disc or location on the court.

ISA
International Shuffleboard Association: https://world-shuffleboard.org/

Kiss
The cue disc narrowly touching a side of a live disc intentionally, thus diverting the cue disc from its direct path of movement to reach an intended destination.

Kitchen
1. Shoot or move a disc into the 10-off. 2. Describes a shot which puts a disc into the 10-off. 3. 10-OFF. Reportedly derived from the German word kittchen, a colloquial term for jail (equivalent to the English slang term "hoosegow").

Kitchen Bait
A disc stopped in a position on the board that tempts the opponent to target it, but may leave the opponent's cue disc in a position on the board where it can be easily kitchened.

Kitchen Player
A player who often shoots to kitchen their opponent's discs, often choosing such a shot over more conservative play such as hiding a disc behind a guard.

Kitchen Speed
The speed of a cue disc which will result in the cue disc or a target disc to be kitchened.

Kitchen Speed Plus
The speed of a cue disc which will result in a target disc to either be kitchened or travel beyond the kitchen, used to prevent the target disc from stopping in the 7 if the shooting player errs on the slow side.

Lag
Two opposing players alternatingly shooting discs at the lagline to determine which player or partner team chooses their disc color before the start of a game. The player whose final lag disc stops closest to the center of the lagline wins the choice of colors.

Lagline
The deadline when used to lag for disc color choice before the start of a game.

Lid
BLOCK (def. 2).

Liner
A disc which is not a scoring disc because it touches one or more of the lines of the scoring diagram.

Live Disc
Any disc on the board during game play which is either in motion or has stopped on the board after at least reaching the deadline and hasn't touched an alley. A live disc sometimes may be declared a dead disc for a rules violation. Once the score for an end is announced and recorded, the live discs become dead discs and are removed from the board to continue play.

Lose One's Hammer
Fail to score more points than one's opponent for an end where one had the hammer shot.

Low
DEEP.

Magic Circle
The scores in a point game which are within two scoring discs of a game winning score.

Match
1. In tournament play, a complete set of one or more competitive games played by the same opponents to determine who advances, which bracket each advances in and/or what rank one or each places in the tournament. 2. In league play, a complete set of one or more competitive games played by two of the league teams.

Mess
A description of the board where there are multiple discs lying on the scoring diagram during the play of an end usually resulting in more scoring discs than the usually ideal strategy of clearing the board and scoring the hammer. A board can be "clean" from clearing or a "mess".

Mingles
A tournament format wherein matches consist of a single frame game, with a draw for a new court assignment for every player (and thereby a new partner in the case of doubles) each match. Every entrant plays every match - there is no elimination. Tournament winners are usually determined by overall number of games won and/or total game points added together for all of the player's wins. "Singles Mingles" originally meant a Mingles tournament consisting of Singles games, but now most often is used to mean a Mingles tournament of doubles games.

No Good
Describes a disc on the scoring diagram which is not a scoring disc.

No Man's Land
The area of the court between the two deadlines.

Non-Walking Singles
A singles game where the players shoot discs from only one end for all frames.

NSA
USA NSA.

Number
1. Any of the scoring areas except the 10-Off. 2. SCORING DISC.

Open Board
The condition where most or all of the scoring diagram is unobstructed and unoccupied by live discs before a shot is made.

Out
Indicates the disc color that shoots first in an end. "Yellow out" means that the player shooting the yellow discs goes first. Yellow is usually the color to be out at the beginning of a game.

Percentage Shot
The less risky of a choice of shots as it has a higher chance of success (that is, succeeds a higher precentage of the time). Good strategy dictates taking the percentage shot even if it has lower blocking or scoring value than a riskier choice. If the player is in imminent danger of losing the game, they may need to ignore the precentage shot and try for the higher risk result.

Pigeon
A disc lying on the line 7/10-off line with a significant portion within the 7, which is liable to be bumped up into the 10-off, leaving the striking disc as a scoring disc in the 7. Also CRIPPLE.

Pilot
1. TAMPA. 2. GUARD.

Play the Drift
Shoot one's discs in a manner that compensates for the changes in the direction of cue discs due to the drift of the court.

Point Game
A game that finishes at the conclusion of any end wherein the total recorded score of either singles player or of either team of doubles players is equal to or greater than a pre-determined number and the game winner is then determined by the highest score. Play may continue if the total scores are tied, usually for the amount of additional frames needed to give every player one additional hammer.

Puck
DISC.

Put a Handle On
Endanger a hidden disc by shooting the cue disc or moving a target disc to a position where it can be used for a combination or carom shot to remove the hidden disc.

Reverse
A shot where one's disk strikes an opponent's scoring disc, removing the scoring disc and leaving one's disc in the same scoring area.

Reverse a Kitchen
A combination shot that bumps an opponent's disc into the kitchen where it bumps one's own disc that was in the kitchen out and the opponent's disc stops in the kitchen.

Roll
1. A largely lateral movement of a disc after striking a target disc that brings it to stop on the board, often intentionally in a favorable position. (Example: "The cue disc had a perfect roll after striking the guard.") 2. Cause a disc to move mostly laterally after striking a target disc in order to stop in a favorable position on the board. (Example: "He shot to roll his disc to a scoring ten after clearing the guard.")

Roll-Over
A shot where a disc moves in a roll to a hidden scoring position after striking a target disc.

Round
1. In singles, the portion of a game wherein two competing players complete two frames of play. In Walking Singles, this consists of one frame completed at each end, for a total of two frames. In Non-Walking Singles, if there are two competing players at each end of the court this consists of two frames completed at each end, for a total of four frames. 2. In doubles, the portion of a game wherein the competing players at each end complete one frame of play, for a total of two completed frames.

Round Robin
1. A singles game format, usually played by three or by more than four players, where the players rotate shooting positions counter-clockwise after each frame. For example, in a three-player game, after the first frame is completed the player at head yellow moves to foot yellow, the player at head black moves to head yellow and the player at foot yellow (who did not shoot discs in the frame) moves to foot black. When played by more than four players, excess players may sit out from play each frame, but the same order of rotation will be maintained. 2. A tournament format wherein each player or team plays a match against either every other player or team in the tournament or against every other player or team in a divided group of the tournament participants.

Rush the Game
Take an unnecessary risk in an attempt to score one or more extra discs near the end of a game in an effort to bring the game to a faster close.

Score One's Hammer
1. Shoot the hammer disc such that it adds at least one scoring disc to one's total for the end. 2. Score at least 7 more points than one's opponent for an end where one had the hammer shot.

Scoreboard
The display board used to record player or team scores at the completion of each frame, located at the head of each court.

Scoring Area
One of the areas within the scoring diagram where a live disc is a scoring disc, including the areas of 7, 8, 10 and 10-off.

Scoring Diagram
The set of painted lines at each end of the court, mostly triangular in overall shape, which define the areas where stopped live discs score points. Sometimes the term excludes the area forming the 10-off. Also BOARD, HOUSE, SCORING TRIANGLE, TRIANGLE.

Scoring Disc
A live disc that has stopped inside the scoring diagram not touching any lines (with the exception of the separation triangle in the 10-off). Also NUMBER.

Scoring Triangle
SCORING DIAGRAM.

See a Disc
Able to view a sufficient exposed portion of a hidden disc such that it can be struck by the cue disc.

Separation Triangle
The painted lines within the center of the starting area, along with any area between these lines, that separate the starting area into two equal halves, one for each of the two colors of discs.

Shoot
Impel a disc towards the opposite end of the court.

Shooting Area
1. The area of the court between the baseline and the rear edge of the court, where players stand while shooting discs. Also STANDING AREA, APRON. 2. STARTING AREA.

Short Game
A 75-point game format where each player or team starts with a score of 45. Used mainly in friendly games to practice proper end-game strategy for tournaments.

Sideline
One of the diagonal outside lines of the scoring diagram.

Silent Captain
The scoreboard as a guidepost to decide during a game one's best choice of shot or game strategy going forward, taking into account the current scores, the number of points or frames remaining in the game, which color has the current hammer, the color that has the next hammers, and other strategic factors.

Singles
1. A game where one player competes against one other player. 2. A tournament format wherein players enter the tournament individually and play matches against other individual players.

Singles Mingles
See MINGLES.

Slow
1. Describes a court where the discs require more impelling force than usual to slide from one end to the other due to the condition of the court. 2. Describes a disc which takes more force than usual to slide down the court due to the condition of the disc.

Sneak
A shot to directly place the cue disk in a scoring position that is protected by an existing guard, especially when shot between two guards or behind a guard that is in a position that usually acts as a guard for the opponent.

Snuggle
Place a scoring disc close in front of a live disc.

Soup
10-OFF.

Speed Shot
A shot before the start of a game to learn about the speed of the court and discs. There are usually two speed shots for each player as part of the practice shots taken.

Spot Shooting
While shooting the cue disc, focusing on a selected spot of the nearer scoring diagram in order to direct the cue disc over and beyond that spot to ensure it travels towards its intended target.

St. Pete
A guard which is about halfway between one side of the tip of the 10 and the edge of the court. A St. Pete is an effective guard for a player when positioned on the same side of the court as the player's opponent. Also CROSS GUARD, CROSS PILOT.

Staging Area
STARTING AREA.

Standing Area
SHOOTING AREA (def. 1).

Starting Area
The section of the scoring diagram, at the end from which the players are shooting, that is between the baseline, the bottom line of the 7s and the sidelines. All the discs must be placed completely within the starting area, not touching any lines including the separation triangle, before any disc is shot at the start of an end. Also STAGING AREA, SHOOTING AREA.

Steal the Hammer
Prevent your opponent from scoring the hammer. Also, STOP THE HAMMER.

Steam
Used in expressions humorously to point out that a disc has landed in the kitchen. (Examples: "Your disc is steaming now!"; "The steam is rising on that one!")

Stick
1. A moving disc stopping on the board at the point of contact when clearing a target disc. 2. A moving disc stopping somewhere exposed on the board. 3. CUE.

Stop the Hammer
STEAL THE HAMMER.

Sucker's Hide
A St. Pete or Tampa intentionally placed somewhat out of position, usually too far left or right, to tempt the opponent to try to use it as their own guard to lead the opponent to make mistakes in shooting or strategy.

Suicide Alley
The path from the side of the starting area closest to the edge of the court to the other end on the same side of the court, keeping towards the edge of the court. The cue disc more often stops in the 10-off when this path is used in an attempt to score the cue disc behind a guard than any other path.

Tampa
A guard that is near one side of the tip of the 10. A Tampa is an effective guard for a player when positioned on the same side of the 10 as the player. Also PILOT.

Tang
CUE.

Target Disc
A disc on the board that a player targets to be contacted and moved by the cue disc or by another disc that is moved by the cue disc.

Tourist Disc
A cue disc which completely misses a target disc in an attempt to clear, and continues well beyond, usually through the kitchen and off the board.

Trap
A disc shot onto a location on the board where it entices a player to make a shot that will likely result in an advantage to their opponent. The shot disc may deceive the player into leaving a particular live disc on the board, taking a shot which gives a scoring disadvantage or making a shot which likely will give the opponent an opening to make a shot to a strategic advantage.

Triangle
SCORING DIAGRAM.

Turkey Shoot
A singles tournament format wherein each player shoots a set of eight discs on an empty board to score as many points as possible for each frame. Usually a disc in the kitchen scores plus ten points instead of minus ten. Reportedly so called as originally a turkey was awarded as a prize to the winner.

Up And Down
A shot where the cue disc clears a target disc that is scoring in the 10, sticks in the 10 as a scoring disc, and bumps the target disc forward into the kitchen. The result is "10 Up" and "10 Down". Also 10-MINUS-10.

USA NSA
USA National Shuffleboard Association: https://usansa.weebly.com/

Walking Singles
A singles game where the players shoot all the discs from one end of the court to complete a frame, then walk to the other end to shoot all the discs from there to complete the next frame. The players continue to switch ends each frame.

Waste One's Shot
Shoot to either place the cue disc in a position which is outside the scoring triangle and doesn't afford any strategic advantage (e.g., doesn't serve as a guard or block) or to become a dead disc (into an alley, beyond the kitchen or short of the deadline) without touching any other disc on the board. This shot is made, usually when one is ahead in score, to avoid giving one's opponent a chance to kitchen the disc or use it for some other advantage.

Yellow
1. The lighter of the two colors of a set of discs. 2. The player who shoots this color discs. 3. The side of the court where this color discs are placed in the starting area.

Yellow Court
A court that has the strongest drift from the yellow side towards the black side, thereby favoring the player shooting the yellow discs.